A brief discussion with my doctor

I broke my foot a few weeks back.  It was on a Sunday afternoon and by evening it was obvious that it was more than just a good bruise.  Monday morning at 9am I called a doctor in a nearby small town, a specialist who is on my insurance company’s doctor list, and got an appointment that day at about lunch time.  I paid my co-pay, got an x-ray in the same office, saw the orthopedic, and left with a nice space-age feeling walking cast that even allowed removal for showering.  Nice.  I spent a total of just over an hour in the doctor’s office on the same day that I called.  This is typical of my many experiences with health care in America.

A month later I went back to get x-rayed again.  When the orthopedic came in to look at the x-ray and check my foot he saw that I was reading Mark Levin’s Liberty and Tyranny.  Like so many other people that I have encountered, the doctor has Levin’s monumental book as well and it sparked a conversation about the current health care debate.

My doctor was originally from Canada and had first hand experience with their socialized medicine.  He was strongly opposed to government health care and told me that in Canada their “elixir of the masses” is Tylenol-3.  He shared a story of a Canadian friend who suffered a torn rotator cuff only to be given a limitless supply of Tylenol-3 with no real prospect of any surgery to repair his injury.

I personally know almost a half dozen middle class little league dads who have had rotator cuff surgery here in the US under the system that Pelosi, Reid, and Obama want to dismantle.

Socialist Health Care is only good for losers and statists.

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2 responses to “A brief discussion with my doctor

  1. What’s your problem? Do you have something against Tylenol-3? It’s a good drug. Get a grip. 😉

  2. Actually, though it had nothing to do with my post I do have a problem with it because I am allergic to codeine! ;^)

    But the point is that the gov’t is willing to constantly throw a temporary solution at a real problem just to cut costs. The people involved do not really matter.

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